Fall Reading List

Fall Reading List

It’s beginning to feel like fall outside and one of the things we love most about the changing of the seasons is reading new books! Below you will find a few recommended children’s books. You can find these books in our library if you would like to borrow them to read to your child. 

Here and Now by Julia Denos

Fall Walk by Virginia Brimhall Snow

In the Middle of Fall by Kevin Henkes
Some of the links in this post are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, Greenspring Montessori School will earn a commission if you click through and purchase an affiliate resource. We take special care to recommend resources that worked well for us or came highly recommended. If you would like to increase the amount your purchase impacts our school, please make sure to select the Montessori Society of Central MD Inc. as the charity you are supporting when using Amazon Smile. All book recommendations are also available for borrowing in our school library.
Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Technology

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Technology

Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students is used as a guideline for all technology literacy lessons. 

Lower Elementary

Overview:

Students visit the Media Lab once a week for a scheduled computer lesson on basic computer fundamentals.  Each lesson begins with a short tutorial (https://edu.gcfglobal.org/en/) followed by simple activities to practice these skills. This introduction provides students with basic knowledge such as the functions of hardware, mouse terminology and computer rules. Students will recognize and identify the function of the major hardware components in the computer system. Students use the mouse to perform computer functions, recognize symbols and icons used to identify common functions, and use the keyboard to type letters and numbers, and learn how to use special key functions. Students are expected to use technology in a responsible manner. Digital citizenship and internet safety are part of our instruction at every level. 

  • Log on and off the computer
  • Power on and off the computer
  • Open and close applications
  • Open, Save and close files
  • Print documents
  • Identify parts of a computer
  • Use input device (mouse): Point, select/ click or double click, click/select and hold, drag and drop
  • Move cursor
  • Type / enter letters and numbers
  • Recognize and use icons to perform computer and software functions
  • Use special function keys: delete, shift, arrow keys, space, return / enter, caps lock, backspace, multi-key functions, escape

Keyboarding:

Keyboarding is a foundational skill largely related to motor skills. Students should be able to operate a keyboard effectively in order to take full advantage of computer technology. Students have been introduced to typing club (www.typingclub.com) which is the recommended program that teaches correct finger-to key movement across the entire keyboard. It is a highly effective tool that helps students at all skill levels improve their typing ability through guided lessons and engaging assessments. To fully support the development of typing skills, the expectations for utilizing this site at home is to practice three times per week for no longer than 15 minutes per session. Students will be bringing home a password card with your login information.

Upper Elementary

Overview:

Upper Elementary students visit the Media Lab once a week for a scheduled computer lesson on intermediate computer fundamentals.  Each lesson begins with a short tutorial (https://edu.gcfglobal.org/en/) followed by engaging activities to practice these skills. Students will develop foundations in the understanding and uses of technology systems. These skills provide students the ability to demonstrate knowledge of technology concepts and systems. 

  • Recognize and identify the function of the major hardware components in a computer system. 
  • Identify and use functions represented by symbols and icons commonly found in applications.
  • Identify characteristics that describe input devices and output devices and name some devices that can provide input and output.
  • Understand that there are correct sitting, hand, arm and fingering positions when keyboarding. 
  • Identify types of files by their icons and extensions.
  • Use keyboard and mouse effectively and efficiently.
  • Identify strategies for managing everyday hardware and software problems. 

Students have access to the Media Lab during the morning work cycle to do classroom-related research and digital projects. Upper Elementary students will use computers to research subjects they are interested in, after they have exhausted all resources in the classroom and the school library. 

Email: 

Students have an email account and are for school purposes only. Students have been introduced to Gmail and Google Drive. Students will learn how to manage, send, and respond to messages and how to use it safely. Google Drive is a service from Google that gives students access to web-based applications for creating documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and allows students to store files online and access them anywhere using the cloud. 

Internet Safety:

Students are expected to use technology in a responsible manner. Digital citizenship and internet safety are part of our instruction at every level. Students will learn strategies for staying safe and secure online, learn how to avoid the most common treats and protect their computer and privacy. 

Keyboarding:

Keyboarding is a foundational skill largely related to motor skills. Students should be able to operate a keyboard effectively in order to take full advantage of computer technology. Students have been introduced to typing club (www.typingclub.com) which is the recommended program that teaches correct finger-to key movement across the entire keyboard. It is a highly effective tool that helps students at all skill levels improve their typing ability through guided lessons and engaging assessments. To fully support the development of typing skills, the expectations for utilizing this site at home is to practice three times per week for no longer than 15 minutes per session. Students will be bringing home a password card with your login information.

 

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Library

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Library

Children’s House

Students visit the library weekly with their class. Each library visit includes a pre-selected, purposeful read-aloud. Some of our story topics are about family and friends, kindness, helping others, fall activities, fall and winter holidays and animals in fall and winter.

Students are introduced to the skills and concepts needed to be successful in the library, such as book check-out, book care, and the parts of the library. Students follow library circulation procedures and select books based on their need and reading level. Library books are circulated for a period of one week. Each class has a scheduled library day and materials need to be returned the following week in order to check-out additional materials.

Topics include:

  • Demonstrate how to properly care for books.
  • Demonstrate correct book selection and circulation procedures.
  • Locate the basic parts of a book
  • Recognize that the title tells the name of the book.
  • Recognize that the author write the word of the book.
  • Recognize that the illustrator creates the art that tells the story in pictures.
  • Actively listen and creatively respond to literature shared in a group setting.
  • Retell a story – Illustrate the events from beginning, middle and end of a story.

CH Literary Circles

Third year students visit the library weekly to listen to a variety of stories and poems. Stories are followed by a group discussion and literary activities to develop an understanding of story elements such as identify the title, author and illustrator, character traits, summarize the details of a setting, major events and problem and solution in the story. Using retelling sticks, we ask about key details in the text and are able to retell stories, while identifying and describing story elements. Students will develop their skills in listening and oral communication, as well as reasoning and critical thinking.

 

Fall Reading List

Books Related to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Belonging

          

We recently displayed a selection of books for children that feature a diverse range of characters and cover topics on the theme of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. If you would like to check out any of these books from Greenspring Montessori, please visit our Library from 9:00am-3:00pm, Monday through Friday.

2-6 Years

Be Kind, Pat Zietlow Miller

Because, Mo Willems

Feast for 10, Catheryn Falwell

Last Stop on Market Street, Matt De La Pena

My Mei Mei, Ed Young

Peace in an Offering, Annette LeBox

Peekaboo Morning, Rachel Isadora

Thank You Omu! Oge Mora

We’ve Got the Whole World in Our Hands, Rafael Lopez

          

4-8 Years

Ada Twist, Scientist, Andrea Beaty

Ada’s Violin, Susan Hood

Alma and How She Got Her Name, Juana Martinez-Neal

Drawn Together, Minh Le

El Libro Mágico de Pombo, Rafael Pombo

Emily’s Blue Period, Cathleen Daly

Firebird, Misty Copeland

Freedom Summer, Deborah Wiles

Good Morning Yoga, Mariam Gates

Home, Carson Ellis

Home Sweet Home, Mia Cassany

I am Human, Susan Verde

I Walk with Vanessa: a Story about a Simple Act of Kindness, Kerascoët

Just Ask! Sonia Sotomayor

Lend a Hand, John Frank

Love, Matt De La Pena

Maddie’s Fridge, Lois Brandt

Mango, Abuela, and Me, Meg Medina

Maria Montessori, Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Maybe Something Beautiful, F. Isabel Campoy

Say Something, Peter Reynolds

She Persisted, Chelsea Clinton

The Thing Lou Couldn’t Do, Ashley Spires

This is How We Do It, Matt Lamothe

Today, Julie Morstad

Violet’s Music, Angela Johnson

We Are All Welcome, Alexandra Penfold & Suzanne Kaufman

              

6-10 Years

14 Cows for America, Carmen Agra Deedy

Cilla Lee-Jenkins: This Book is a Classic, Susan Tan

Front Desk, Kelly Yang

King and Kayla series, Dori Hillestad Buyler

Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, Vashti Harrison

Lola Levine series, Monica Brown

Malala: My Story of Standing Up for Girls’ Rights, Malala Yousafzai

Mamá, ¿por qué nadie es como nosotros? Luis María Pescetti

Me, Frida, and the Secret of the Peacock Ring, Angela Cervantes

Peter Va a Colombia, Craig Klein Dexemple

Out of Wonder, Kwame Alexander

Serafina’s Promise, Ann E. Burg

The Invisible Boy, Patrice Barton

The Season of Styx Malone, Kekla Magoon

The Year of the Dog, Grace Lin

Wonder, R.J. Palacio

              

10 Years & Up

Brown Girl Dreaming, Jacqueline Woodson

Count Me In, Varsha Bajaj

Mindful Me: Mindfulness and Meditation for Kids, Whitney Stewart

Zane and the Hurricane, Rodman Philbrick

 

Spring Library Update

Spring Library Update

Weeding is an essential component of library management. It is an ongoing part of collection development, a planned and thoughtful action that will ensure library materials are current and enticing. This process ensures the removal of regularly outdated or irrelevant library resources and allows room for new materials!

We have been working all year to weed through our library. During this process, we have removed 1,400 books from our collection. All weeded materials are donated to Veterans of America. New materials are added continuously throughout the school year to meet the needs of our community. As we build our collection, we choose materials that are high quality, age appropriate, current and accurate, and a reflection of community, cultural exploration, and global understanding. Here are some great resources for you to explore:
http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia
https://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/multicultural-reading-resources/diversity-book-lists-for-kids/

When students walk into the library, they immediately see resources that allow them to connect to the larger world around them. Books, materials, resources, and programs that introduce cultural exploration, foster global understanding, and facilitate language learning are showcased throughout the library.

The Greenspring Montessori School Library is committed to creating an inclusive environment by promoting curiosity and inquiry in our students and the research habits needed to find great information and a love of reading. All materials are chosen to enrich and support the curriculum of Greenspring Montessori School and the educational, emotional, and recreational needs of the users.

The Library is open during school hours and families are welcome to visit during those times. Come on by and see some of our newly acquired books!

New Books in the library:

The Name Jar, Yangsook Choi
Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her. So instead of introducing herself on the first day of school, she tells the class that she will choose a name by the following week. Her new classmates are fascinated by this no-name girl and decide to help out by filling a glass jar with names for her to pick from. But while Unhei practices being a Suzy, Laura, or Amanda, one of her classmates comes to her neighborhood and discovers her real name and its special meaning. On the day of her name choosing, the name jar has mysteriously disappeared. Encouraged by her new friends, Unhei chooses her own Korean name and helps everyone pronounce it—Yoon-Hey.

Jabari Jumps, Gaia Cornwall
Jabari is definitely ready to jump off the diving board. He’s finished his swimming lessons and passed his swim test, and he’s a great jumper, so he’s not scared at all. “Looks easy,” says Jabari, watching the other kids take their turns. But when his dad squeezes his hand, Jabari squeezes back. He needs to figure out what kind of special jump to do anyway, and he should probably do some stretches before climbing up onto the diving board. In a sweetly appealing tale of overcoming your fears, newcomer Gaia Cornwall captures a moment between a patient and encouraging father and a determined little boy you can’t help but root for.

Over and Under the Pond, Kate Messner
In this gorgeous companion to the acclaimed Over and Under the Snow and Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt, Kate Messner and Christopher Silas Neal bring to life a secret underwater world. In this book, readers will discover the plants and animals that make up the rich, interconnected ecosystem of a mountain pond. Over the pond, the water is a mirror, reflecting the sky. But under the pond is a hidden world of minnows darting, beavers diving, tadpoles growing. These and many other secrets are waiting to be discovered…over and under the pond.

Don’t Touch My Hair, Sharee Miller
It seems that wherever Aria goes, someone wants to touch her hair. In the street, strangers reach for her fluffy curls; and even under the sea, in the jungle, and in space, she’s chased by a mermaid, monkeys, and poked by aliens…until, finally, Aria has had enough!

SAY SOMETHING! Peter H. Reynolds
In this empowering new picture book, beloved author Peter H. Reynolds explores the many ways that a single voice can make a difference. Each of us, each and every day, have the chance to say something: with our actions, our words, and our voices. Perfect for kid activists everywhere, this timely story reminds readers of the undeniable importance and power of their voice. There are so many ways to tell the world who you are… what you are thinking… and what you believe. And how you’ll make it better. The time is now: SAY SOMETHING!

I AM HUMAN: A Book of Empathy, Susan Verde
From the picture book dream team behind I Am Yoga and I Am Peace comes the third book in their wellness series: I Am Human. A hopeful meditation on all the great (and challenging) parts of being human, I Am Human shows that it’s okay to make mistakes while also emphasizing the power of good choices by offering a kind word or smile or by saying “I’m sorry.” At its heart, this picture book is a celebration of empathy and compassion that lifts up the flawed fullness of humanity and encourages children to see themselves as part of one big imperfect family—millions strong.

These Bees Count! Alison Formento
How do bees count? The bees at the Busy Bee Farm buzz through the sky as one big swarm, fly over two waving dandelions, find three wild strawberries dripping tasty nectar… As the children in Mr. Tate’s class listen, they learn how bees work to produce honey and make food and flowers grow. Bees count—they’re important to us all. Alison Formento’s gentle message is illustrated with Sarah Snow’s bright, realistic papercuts.

Me, Frida, and the Secret of the Peacock Ring, Angela Cervantes
Paloma Marquez is traveling to Mexico City, birthplace of her deceased father, for the very first time. She’s hoping that spending time in Mexico will help her unlock memories of the too-brief time they spent together.
While in Mexico, Paloma meets Lizzie and Gael, who present her with an irresistible challenge: The siblings want her to help them find a valuable ring that once belonged to beloved Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Finding the ring means a big reward — and the thanks of all Mexico. What better way to honor her father than returning a priceless piece of jewelry that once belonged to his favorite artist! But the brother and sister have a secret. Do they really want to return the ring, or are they after something else entirely?

The Parker Inheritance, Varian Johnson
When Candice finds a letter in an old attic in Lambert, South Carolina, she isn’t sure she should read it. It’s addressed to her grandmother, who left the town in shame. But the letter describes a young woman. An injustice that happened decades ago. A mystery enfolding its writer. And the fortune that awaits the person who solves the puzzle. So with the help of Brandon, the quiet boy across the street, she begins to decipher the clues. The challenge will lead them deep into Lambert’s history, full of ugly deeds, forgotten heroes, and one great love; and deeper into their own families, with their own unspoken secrets. Can they find the fortune and fulfill the letter’s promise before the answers slip into the past yet again?