Spring Enrichment Curriculum – Spanish

Spring Enrichment Curriculum – Spanish

Spanish at Greenspring Montessori School is oriented to present an introduction to the language and culture of Spanish speaking countries. It is designed to enable the students to communicate in Spanish in simple, everyday conversations and acts as a stepping stone to the next level of study. Students learn basic and meaningful vocabulary and phonetics, they are introduced to the fundamentals of grammar, begin to read and write in Spanish, and gain cultural awareness so they develop a greater understanding of the world in which they live in.

The Spanish Spring 2020 Curriculum presents the details of activities that take place during Spanish Enrichment time. The program, in general, focuses on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. The proficiency level of the students is expected to range between novice-mid to intermediate-mid on the ACTFL scale. Students learn various thematic units, use basic vocabulary and phrases and interact in various social situations. In addition, students develop an awareness of the distinct cultures, traditions, and celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world. 

Children’s House 

Children’s House students explore Spanish using songs, games, finger plays, stories, short activities and specific lessons to build on vocabulary and exposure to the Spanish language and culture in the Spanish speaking world. For the Dual-Language classrooms, the third-year students have a half-hour of dedicated Spanish in addition to the regular lessons given by the assistant. The second-trimester curriculum starts with a brief review of greetings, feelings, and common expressions, followed by working with materials that present different parts of the body, parts of the house, and ending with the weather and clothing. It is expected that during the second trimester of the year Children’s House students will be exposed to vocabulary and songs that help them learn and use previously learned vocabulary to: 

  • Recognize the different parts of the body and face 
  • Answer to the question ¿Qué es esto? 
  • Be able to name different parts of a house. 
  • Answer to the questions ¿Cuántos (cuántas) hay? And ¿Dónde está el/la…? 
  • Identify some words to refer to the weather. 
  • Recognize some basic words to talk about clothing. 
  • Answer to Qué, Dónde and Cuántos questions 

The songs that we sing with the children are mostly from the music groups Cantoalegre ( https://www.youtube.com/user/ccantoalegre/featured ) and Cantajuego (https://www.youtube.com/user/CantaJuegoVEVO) 

Lower Elementary 

Lower Elementary students explore Spanish using TPR (Total Physical Response – created by James Asher), and specific lessons to acquire new vocabulary and to practice what they learned in Children’s House. Students are also exposed to some of the different cultures and traditions found in the Spanish speaking world. At this level, since movement is the key, comprehension comes first, and then, there is a point where students are ready to talk, to read, and eventually, ready to write. Each lesson starts with a short chanting activity that is useful to review vocabulary and to transition the students into the Spanish time. It is expected that during the second trimester of the year Lower Elementary students will: 

  • Review expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom and basic commands to move around campus and in the classroom 
  • The Spanish alphabet and special sounds 
  • Recognize and use words and short sentences to name parts of a house, the weather, and some clothing. 
  • Continue working with opposites and contrasts. 
  • Read short sentences or paragraphs and identify what they are about. 
  • Be able to ask simple questions to gather information. 

Upper Elementary 

Upper Elementary students explore Spanish using TPR & TPR Storytelling, and through specific lessons and mini-projects to acquire new vocabulary and to practice what they learned in previous years. Students are also exposed to some of the beliefs, food, and traditions of the people from different Spanish speaking countries. During the second trimester of the school year, students will review and practice basic commands and work with materials to understand the function of words. It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Upper Elementary students will: 

  • Review expressions of courtesy in Spanish 
  • Review the alphabet and special sounds. 
  • Understand the main idea and some information in short texts. 
  • Start creating sentences and a series of sentences to tell a short story about their life, activities, events, and other experiences. 

Adolescent Community 

The Adolescent Community Spanish curriculum focuses on strengthening the interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills, providing the basis to better prepare students for the high school world language sequence. Students learn various thematic units, use basic vocabulary and phrases and interact in various social situations. In addition, students develop an awareness of the distinct cultures, traditions, and celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world. Adolescent Community students will learn the language in a more traditional way, with a variety of activities to promote a successful learning experience. Each set of lessons presents new vocabulary words pertaining to a particular theme. Each topic is first presented in context and then the vocabulary is further practiced through a variety of activities. All the students are encouraged to have an active participation. It is expected that during the second trimester of the year Adolescent Community students will review, learn, and practice:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom 
  • Uses of personal pronouns 
  • The alphabet and special sounds 
  • Working with paragraph-length texts to follow the main message, sometimes in various time frames. 
  • Working with audio files to understand the main idea and flow of events expressed in various time frames in songs, conversations, and discussions. 
  • Writing sentences or paragraphs to present information on a variety of familiar and some concrete researched topics.
Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Spanish

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Spanish

Spanish at Greenspring Montessori School is oriented to present an introduction to the language and culture of Spanish speaking countries. It is designed to enable the students to communicate in Spanish in simple, everyday conversations and acts as a stepping stone to the next level of study. Students learn basic and meaningful vocabulary and phonetics, they are introduced to the fundamentals of grammar, begin to read and write in Spanish, and gain cultural awareness so they develop a greater understanding of the world in which they live in. 

Spanish language is brought periodically to all the classrooms, and its content is based on the essentials of everyday life. Starting with basic vocabulary and phonetics in Toddlers and Children’s House and continuing in Elementary with grammar, short compositions, plays, and readings, which include poems and texts taken from different sources. When the students move to the Adolescent Community, the Spanish curriculum emphasizes language not only as a tool for communication, but as a means of developing awareness of appreciation for people of other cultures. 

The materials used have been carefully selected to meet the student’s mind, from Children’s House to Adolescent Community, and to foster progress on each of the language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing). Because the study of a language is a cumulative process, the student is encouraged to participate as much as possible during the Spanish time or when interacting with Spanish speakers around the school. 

“LA CASA DE ESPAÑOL Fall 2019 Curriculum” presents the details of activities that take place during Spanish Enrichment time. The program, in general, focuses on the 3 modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. The proficiency level of the students is expected to range between novice-mid to intermediate-mid on the ACTFL scale. Students learn various thematic units, use basic vocabulary and phrases and interact in various social situations. In addition, students develop an awareness of the distinct cultures, traditions and celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world.

“Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things.” – Flora Lewis

Children’s House

Children’s House students explore Spanish using songs, games, finger plays, stories, short activities and specific lessons to build on vocabulary and exposure to the Spanish language and culture in the Spanish speaking world. For the Dual-Language classrooms, the third year students have a half hour of dedicated Spanish in addition to the regular lessons given by the assistant.

This curriculum presents the expected outcomes for the first trimester of the year in Spanish Enrichment time. 

The fall curriculum starts with greetings and introductions, followed by working with numbers and colors, and ending with the days of the week and daily routines.

Music is used to transition students into the Spanish time. 

  • Each lesson begins with the song “Hola para ti y para mi”
  • Traditional songs enrich the class with new vocabulary and repetition of known words.

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Children’s House students will learn:

  • How to greet and how to answer to the “What is your name?” In Spanish
  • Numbers from 1 to 20
  • To understand and answer the question “How old are you?”
  • Colors
  • To understand and answer the question “What color is this?”
  • Days of the week and concepts like day and night, today, yesterday, and tomorrow
  • To understand and answer the question “What day is today?”
  • Daily routine activities
  • Feelings
  • To understand and answer the question “How do you feel?” or “How are you?”

Each lesson ends with reading a book that has a content related to the vocabulary or context presented during the lesson.

RESOURCES 

Songs & Poems Books
¿Cómo te llamas tú?

¡Hola! Para ti y para mi 

Arbolito del Perú

Buenos días

Adiós con las manitos

Cuenten conmigo

Yo tenia diez perritos

Un elefante se balanceaba

Rima del chocolate

Los colores (Song)

Los colores (Poem)

Amarillo el pollito

Siete días son

Los días de la semana

Pompón

Arriba Juan

El baile de las emociones

Canción de la felicidad

Este Soy Yo  by Robleda, Margarita

Mango, Abuela and Me – Medina, Meg

Buenos días, Anita – Kratky, Lada J.

Grandes amigos – Lynda Sarah & Benji Davies

Mis Números – Emberley, Rebecca (Board book)

Fiesta! – Foglesong Guy, Ginger (Board book)

Un gato y un perro – Masurel, Claire (Board book)

Cuenta con el Beisbol – Barbiery McGranth, Barbara

José el Chévere – Litwin, Eric

Los Mariachis – Ruesga, Rita Rosa

Lupita y la sorpresa – Caratozzolo, Marcela

Yo veo los Colores – Daley, Marcela

De Colores – Wolff Ashley

Buenas noches maripositas – Bentley, Dawn

Mis Colores – Emberley, Rebecca

El Chile es verde – Greenfield Thong, Roseanne

Los dias de la semana – Sabaté Rodié, Teresa

Buenas noches Gorila – Rattmann Peggy

La Invitación – Campos, Pilar

Así me siento yo – Cain, Janan

Cuando estoy enfadado – Serrano, Lucia

Orejas de Mariposa – Aguilar, Luisa

Lower Elementary

Lower Elementary students explore Spanish using TPR (Total Physical Response – created by James Asher), and specific lessons to acquire new vocabulary and to practice what they  learned in Children’s House. Students are also exposed to some of the different cultures and traditions found in the Spanish speaking world.

At this level, since movement is the key, comprehension comes first, and then, there is a point where students are ready to talk, to read, and eventually, ready to write. 

Students will learn the vocabulary to perform actions (walk, run, jump, open, close…) and vocabulary to name a great variety of objects of their daily life (colors, numbers, shapes, food, and parts of the body just to name a few). 

Short activities are used to transition students into the Spanish time. Each lesson begins with the game “Don Ramón” where vocabulary is reviewed. After “Don Ramón” students dig into the TPR lessons to introduce new vocabulary.

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Lower Elementary students will learn:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom
  • Basic commands to move around campus and in the classroom
  • Uses of personal pronouns in first, second and third person singular and plural in Spanish through movement – Yo, el/ella, tu and usted
  • Parts of the body and objects of the environment
  • Uses of adjectives, where adjectives go in a sentence, and the gender rule for adjectives
  • Uses of frequency adverbs while performing actions
  • Numbers from 1 to …
  • Uses of adverbs of place
  • Shapes
  • Pets and farm animals
  • Food and vocabulary related to the action of eating
  • Basic Personal hygiene and vocabulary related to it 
  • Opposites and contrasts
  • Use of the present continuous form

Upper Elementary

Upper Elementary students explore Spanish using TPR & TPR Storytelling, and through specific lessons and mini-projects to acquire new vocabulary and to practice what they learned in previous years. Students are also exposed to some of the beliefs, food, and traditions of the people from the different Spanish speaking countries.

Upper Elementary students will learn the language in an active way instead of word by word memorization. The variety of activities involved allows a successful learning experience.

Students will initially, through physical response review and practice basic commands and vocabulary. After the first weeks of review, short stories, in combination with TPR are presented, introducing new vocabulary relevant to their daily experiences and some cultural aspects of the Hispanic world. 

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Upper Elementary students will learn:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom
  • Basic commands to move around campus and in the classroom
  • Uses of personal pronouns in first, second and third person singular and plural in Spanish through movement – Yo, el/ella, tu and usted
  • The alphabet and special sounds
  • Parts of the body, objects of the environment, animals, colors, shapes, food, other vocabulary following the students curiosity
  • The months of the year
  • Numbers from 1 to …
  • Uses of adjectives, where adjectives go in a sentence, and the gender rule for adjectives
  • Uses of adverbs
  • Opposites and contrasts
  • Use of the present continuous form

Adolescent Community

Adolescent Community Spanish curriculum focuses on strengthening the  interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills, providing the basis to  better prepare students for the high school world language sequence. Students learn various thematic units, use basic vocabulary and phrases and interact in various social situations. In addition, students develop an awareness of the distinct cultures, traditions and celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world. Students complement the lessons with the book Antes de ser libres by Julia Alvarez. 

Adolescent Community students will learn the language in a more traditional way, with a variety of activities to promote a successful learning experience. Along the school year, some of the lessons will be directly related to what the students have been studying in their regular studies (Literature and Physical Expression)

Each set of lessons presents new vocabulary words pertaining to a particular theme. Each topic is first presented in context and then the vocabulary is further practiced through a variety of activities. All the students are encouraged to have an active participation.

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Adolescent Community students will learn and practice:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom
  • Uses of personal pronouns
  • The alphabet and special sounds
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases: Numbers, colors, parts of the body, animals, food, and other vocabulary following the students curiosity
  • The months of the year
  • Uses of adjectives, where adjectives go in a sentence, and the gender rule for adjectives
  • Uses of adverbs
  • Opposites and contrasts
  • Use of verbs in present and present continuous form
  • Participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish speaking countries 

January Enrichment Update – Spanish

Spanish Enrichment 

                               
Sandra Decombel                                      Marcela Daley                                              Martha Chaux
Toddler Dual Language Assistant            Spanish Enrichment Guide (CH, EL, AC)      Lower El Dual Language Assistant
Toddler Spanish Support Guide               Dual Language Support Specialist (CH)      Dual Language Support

Older Toddlers (Non Dual-Language classrooms, Sra. Sandra)
Short Spanish language lessons given weekly in the Older Toddler communities provide the young children exposure to the Spanish language while at the same time supporting the Montessori method used in the classroom. We start and end the lessons with a short song during which we replicate the grace and courtesy of the classroom. By modeling greetings and farewells, the children are learning the customary way to interact with people in a respectfully and appropriately in our society.

Once everyone has been properly greeted and acknowledged, we explore some everyday objects. Just as in the language lessons of the classroom, we select a collection of objects with which the children have had extensive experience. We use this selection in a modified three period lesson: first providing the name and the object to the child, and then providing the name and the child provides the object. These lessons not only expose the children to the names of objects in Spanish, but they also continue the work of classification and conceptualization of the world around them. In time, the child will move beyond the world of the concrete towards abstract thought.

We also sing simple Spanish songs with gestures. These give the children a cultural aspect of the Spanish language. They also expose the children to rhythms and distinct musical phrasing, while at the same time developing their understanding of letter sounds and word composition. Children are drawn to repeat the songs and thus develop a sense of the phonology of the Spanish language.

Older Toddlers (Dual-Language classroom, Sra. Sandra)

In our Older Toddler Dual Language classroom both languages come together in service of the child, providing cultural expansion where possible. The language section of the classroom, which is one of the two main foci of Toddler Communities, is offered in both languages. The children are acquainted with Spanish words from their everyday environment and are encouraged to share their own world with the classroom by bringing pictures and familiar real objects from home.

Spanish is also used in daily interactions, giving the children experience being addressed in a different language. The children hear how to greet, ask for assistance, use proper table manners, etc. in Spanish. With time, the child’s ears become receptive to Spanish as a spoken language, even if comprehension might not always be present. Some children might even start to use some Spanish words spontaneously in appropriate situations.

Finally, through music, we open the children’s world to Hispanic culture little by little. We sing songs together and recite poems. The children also receive lessons in music appreciation, exploring the sounds of different instruments and listen to compositions of famous Hispanic composers.


Children’s House (Non Dual-Language classrooms, Sra. Marcela)

In the Children’s House we continue practicing how to be patient and wait to be invited to join the circle. It seems like the children understand more now when the lesson is just for the third years.

Practicing how to greet one each other with expressions like hola, ¿como estas?, and buenos días has become a routine and it is common to hear the children greeting me all the time (not just in the classroom) with some of these expressions.

We are singing the Buenos dias song, including the morning, afternoon and night (días, tardes y noches), and some feelings like feeling good, happy, sad, and tired (bien, felíz, triste, cansado o cansada) and some cards are presented to illustrate the time of the day that the song is referring to.

Singing continues being an important part of our circle. Some of the songs are, Hola, para ti y para mi (Hello for you and for me), Coco en la Cueva (Coco in the cave), El sapito (Little frog), la ronda de los Conejos (The rabbit song).


Children’s House (Dual Language classrooms, Sra. Marcela)

These months the children have been working on expanding their Spanish vocabulary with words that have just one vowel sound at the time. And we are working right now with modes of transportation.

A few of the third years have finished all their vowels sounds and their combination and they have started to work with the sounds “ll” and “rr.” The students have been also working with opposites, such as grande and pequeño (big and small), and grueso and Delgado (thick and thin).

We are singing the Buenos dias song, including the morning, afternoon and night (días, tardes y noches), and some feelings like feeling good, happy, sad, and tired (bien, felíz, triste, cansado o cansada) and some cards are presented to illustrate the time of the day that the song is referring to.

We have read different books related to what the children have been practicing. Some of the books are Percebe esta aburrido, El transporte, Mi Atlas Larousse de los animales (with emphasis on South America’s animals), and some poems and fables from Rafael Pombo.

Singing continues being an important part of our circle. Some of the songs are, Hola, para ti y para mi (Hello for you and for me), Coco en la Cueva (Coco in the cave), El sapito (Little frog), la ronda de los Conejos (The rabbit song).


Lower Elementary (Non Dual-Language classroom, Sra. Marcela)

During Spanish Enrichment, the students continue working following acted instructions in Spanish. The sky is the limit. They are understanding when asked to open the door, close the door, bring the pencil, and give the book to a peer… It is just amazing!

In the morning, during the work cycle, small groups have been working on getting more and more comfortable with the different letter sounds and working on how to split words in syllables and how similar it can be to English or French.


Lower Elementary (Dual-Language classroom, Sra. Martha)

The Elementary dual-language students use Spanish in everyday classroom conversation. They practice greetings and taking leave with expressions such as Buenos dias (good morning) Como estas? (How are you?) Bien y tu? (Good and you?), among others. Students also understand basic instructions such as Levantate (stand up), Sientate (sit down), Vamos afuera (let’s go out), etc. They make requests with expressions such as puedo tener un papel? (Can I have a paper?) and Puedo estar en La Mesa de Espanol? (May I join the Spanish table?). They also practice exchanging personal information with expressions such as Cual es tu comida favorita? (What is your favorite food?) and Que te gusta hacer despues de la Escuala? (What do you like to do after School?). Spontaneous conversations in Spanish about likes and dislikes, routines, and daily activities are happening on a regular basis during lessons and lunch time.

Students work on research projects in Spanish on topics such as transportation and parts of the body. They also incorporate Spanish into their mathematics work by counting (and skip counting) in Spanish. Students are greatly enjoying reading Spanish, especially when reading to the little ones in Children House classrooms. The students are making wonderful progress!


Upper Elementary (Sra. Marcela)

The main goal at this level is to have the students being able to participate in conversations where they can create sentences while, at the same time, being able to ask and answer a variety of questions.

During this time of the year, the students have started to work on a project. Some of them have chosen a coffee shop (and they are really interested on the story of coffee as well as the different ways of brewing coffee and why they are so different), others, have chosen a music shop or a pet shop.


Adolescent Community (Sra. Marcela) 

I love how each one of my group lessons with the AC ends in a mini community meeting. I never thought that the work on “La Mejor Familia del Mundo” based on the book with the same name by Susana Lopez will become such an interesting project. The project consists on Identifying the members of the family that they want to describe. Using positive adjectives, they have to list 3 physical and 3 personality characteristics of each one of the family members chosen and include themselves. Express what makes each one of the members of your family the best one on his/her/its role? And then, put together a video, poster, graph, book, or cartoon to present the “Best family in the world.”
Spanish Learning Resources

Spanish Learning Resources

In an effort to expand on your child’s Spanish learning experience at home, Sra. Marcela has put together a list of resources for families.

Music and Videos

Music and language go together. Each song has not just sound, but rhythm and melody, it has texts, words, and sense. In Spanish, there is an important phonetic component involved when singing which helps the child becoming familiar with many elements of the language.

Some of my favorite resources for music in Spanish that can be easily found on Youtube or apple music are:

Cantoalegre

Cantoalegre, is a Colombian producer of music for children. Their music offers a cultural component since they incorporate Latin rhythms in a lot of their songs.

 

Canticuentos

Marlore Anwandter, a Chilean composer, wrote an incredible amount of songs for kids based on what she experienced during her life in Colombia. She wrote about what she saw: Iguanas, donkeys, sugar cane tractors, and more.

 

CantaJuego o Grupo Encanto

This Spanish pedagogical and musical project uses music and movement to promote the development of imagination and fantasy. They sustain that singing and play with songs, allow children to develop their sense of hearing and discrimination of sounds, at the same time that it helps with coordination and corporal expression.

 

Toy Cantando

Toy Cantando is a children books and music publisher specialized in didactic and educational material.

 

123 Andres

Latin Grammy award-winning 123 Andrés describes himself as one of the most exciting new voices on the family music scene. He is based in DC and it is common seeing him performing in the area.

 

Apps

Duolingo

After reviewing some of the apps available in the market for learning languages, I found that most of them are designed for adults. I haven’t use apps for small children but I definitely recommend Duolingo for the older ones to help with learning to read and write.

Songs in Spanish

Songs in Spanish

¡Una bienvenida a la primavera!

 

Toddlers and Children’s House

Is your child coming home singing something you do not recognize? Check these out with your children and sing along!

 

Elementary

The Elementary Students have been working hard writing and rehearsing for their upcoming videos for TV Hispana. Filming will start next month. Among the videos there are some interpretations of children’s books such as: Abrazos y Besos and Por favor, Señor Panda, also an original song, a weather report, a game show and even a presidential candidates debate.

 

Adolescent Community

A key aspect in learning a language is exposure to that language as often as possible. We have introduced in class “Quizlet” as an online resource to review and practice units we have covered in class.

Here are a few other resources to support and provide further exposure:

  • I recently came across a couple other apps I also like: “Drops”, “Spanish Injection”, “Lingualia” and “Gamesforlanguage” free online games and courses will motivate older students and adults to learn and practice their target language with interactive games and/or story-based lessons.

Check them out!

 


 

 

Montessori Spanish Class - Greenspring Montessori School

Are you interested in our Spanish Enrichment and Spanish Immersion Programs? Visit us at Greenspring Montessori School to learn more.

Making Videos for Elementary Spanish

Making Videos for Elementary Spanish

In our Lower and Upper Elementary Spanish classes, we are working on news interviews!

Take a look at these previews, and stay tuned for the completed projects.