Becoming a Going-Out Chaperone

Becoming a Going-Out Chaperone

As part of the Elementary experience at Greenspring Montessori School, students often organize their own Going-Outs. Unlike a field trip, which is usually organized by the teacher and requires whole class participation, a Going-Out is organized by a student or a small group based on what they are researching. Once a student has exhausted the resources in the classroom and the school library, they may look into other community resources. Students pick a place to visit, a professor to meet, or an activity to do, then they research the cost, reach out to the organization to schedule a time, print out directions, and organize a parent volunteer to drive. The students are in charge of every detail of the outing, giving them true ownership of their work. Afterward, many students present what they learned to the entire class in a way that speaks to them. It could be a play, a formal presentation, a book that they create, or something entirely new!

If you are a parent, friend, or relative interested in volunteering, we encourage you to become a Going-Out chaperone. The parent volunteer is there to ensure safety, but leaves the logistics and execution of the trip entirely to the students, even if they make mistakes along the way. Being a Going-Out chaperone is a perfect opportunity for you to learn first-hand about our Elementary program through the work of the students.

To learn more about the requirements to become a Going-Out chaperone, please follow the steps below.

Requirements:

  1. Watch a recorded Going-Out Orientation video above.
  2. Complete this GoogleForm with your availability and other required information.
  3. Print, complete, sign, and submit via scan, mail, drop-off to the school (Chris Youngston Gray) a Motor Vehicle Record Permission Form with a photocopy of your driver’s license. 
  4. Bring your completed State of Maryland LiveScan Pre-registration application (Agency Authorization #9000034783), your state issued ID (drivers license, etc), and payment* to:

Absolute Investigative Services 

604 E. Joppa Rd.
Towson, MD 21286
410-828-6460

Hours of Operation: Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm
Cash or debit/credit card only – No checks accepted Background checks (fingerprinting and childcare approval) total approximately $55 – if you would like to have the school reimburse you for your background check, please contact us and we would be happy to arrange payment for you.

To submit your paperwork or for assistance with logistics, contact:

Chris Youngston Gray, Advancement Assistant, 410-321-8555 x110 or cyoungstongray@greenspringmontessori.org

Next steps:

Once the requirements are met, you will be added to a list of possible chaperones. As needed, students initiating a Going-Out will reach out to the volunteer to request their assistance chaperoning.

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Spanish

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Spanish

Spanish at Greenspring Montessori School is oriented to present an introduction to the language and culture of Spanish speaking countries. It is designed to enable the students to communicate in Spanish in simple, everyday conversations and acts as a stepping stone to the next level of study. Students learn basic and meaningful vocabulary and phonetics, they are introduced to the fundamentals of grammar, begin to read and write in Spanish, and gain cultural awareness so they develop a greater understanding of the world in which they live in. 

Spanish language is brought periodically to all the classrooms, and its content is based on the essentials of everyday life. Starting with basic vocabulary and phonetics in Toddlers and Children’s House and continuing in Elementary with grammar, short compositions, plays, and readings, which include poems and texts taken from different sources. When the students move to the Adolescent Community, the Spanish curriculum emphasizes language not only as a tool for communication, but as a means of developing awareness of appreciation for people of other cultures. 

The materials used have been carefully selected to meet the student’s mind, from Children’s House to Adolescent Community, and to foster progress on each of the language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing). Because the study of a language is a cumulative process, the student is encouraged to participate as much as possible during the Spanish time or when interacting with Spanish speakers around the school. 

“LA CASA DE ESPAÑOL Fall 2019 Curriculum” presents the details of activities that take place during Spanish Enrichment time. The program, in general, focuses on the 3 modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal and presentational. The proficiency level of the students is expected to range between novice-mid to intermediate-mid on the ACTFL scale. Students learn various thematic units, use basic vocabulary and phrases and interact in various social situations. In addition, students develop an awareness of the distinct cultures, traditions and celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world.

“Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things.” – Flora Lewis

Children’s House

Children’s House students explore Spanish using songs, games, finger plays, stories, short activities and specific lessons to build on vocabulary and exposure to the Spanish language and culture in the Spanish speaking world. For the Dual-Language classrooms, the third year students have a half hour of dedicated Spanish in addition to the regular lessons given by the assistant.

This curriculum presents the expected outcomes for the first trimester of the year in Spanish Enrichment time. 

The fall curriculum starts with greetings and introductions, followed by working with numbers and colors, and ending with the days of the week and daily routines.

Music is used to transition students into the Spanish time. 

  • Each lesson begins with the song “Hola para ti y para mi”
  • Traditional songs enrich the class with new vocabulary and repetition of known words.

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Children’s House students will learn:

  • How to greet and how to answer to the “What is your name?” In Spanish
  • Numbers from 1 to 20
  • To understand and answer the question “How old are you?”
  • Colors
  • To understand and answer the question “What color is this?”
  • Days of the week and concepts like day and night, today, yesterday, and tomorrow
  • To understand and answer the question “What day is today?”
  • Daily routine activities
  • Feelings
  • To understand and answer the question “How do you feel?” or “How are you?”

Each lesson ends with reading a book that has a content related to the vocabulary or context presented during the lesson.

RESOURCES 

Songs & Poems Books
¿Cómo te llamas tú?

¡Hola! Para ti y para mi 

Arbolito del Perú

Buenos días

Adiós con las manitos

Cuenten conmigo

Yo tenia diez perritos

Un elefante se balanceaba

Rima del chocolate

Los colores (Song)

Los colores (Poem)

Amarillo el pollito

Siete días son

Los días de la semana

Pompón

Arriba Juan

El baile de las emociones

Canción de la felicidad

Este Soy Yo  by Robleda, Margarita

Mango, Abuela and Me – Medina, Meg

Buenos días, Anita – Kratky, Lada J.

Grandes amigos – Lynda Sarah & Benji Davies

Mis Números – Emberley, Rebecca (Board book)

Fiesta! – Foglesong Guy, Ginger (Board book)

Un gato y un perro – Masurel, Claire (Board book)

Cuenta con el Beisbol – Barbiery McGranth, Barbara

José el Chévere – Litwin, Eric

Los Mariachis – Ruesga, Rita Rosa

Lupita y la sorpresa – Caratozzolo, Marcela

Yo veo los Colores – Daley, Marcela

De Colores – Wolff Ashley

Buenas noches maripositas – Bentley, Dawn

Mis Colores – Emberley, Rebecca

El Chile es verde – Greenfield Thong, Roseanne

Los dias de la semana – Sabaté Rodié, Teresa

Buenas noches Gorila – Rattmann Peggy

La Invitación – Campos, Pilar

Así me siento yo – Cain, Janan

Cuando estoy enfadado – Serrano, Lucia

Orejas de Mariposa – Aguilar, Luisa

Lower Elementary

Lower Elementary students explore Spanish using TPR (Total Physical Response – created by James Asher), and specific lessons to acquire new vocabulary and to practice what they  learned in Children’s House. Students are also exposed to some of the different cultures and traditions found in the Spanish speaking world.

At this level, since movement is the key, comprehension comes first, and then, there is a point where students are ready to talk, to read, and eventually, ready to write. 

Students will learn the vocabulary to perform actions (walk, run, jump, open, close…) and vocabulary to name a great variety of objects of their daily life (colors, numbers, shapes, food, and parts of the body just to name a few). 

Short activities are used to transition students into the Spanish time. Each lesson begins with the game “Don Ramón” where vocabulary is reviewed. After “Don Ramón” students dig into the TPR lessons to introduce new vocabulary.

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Lower Elementary students will learn:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom
  • Basic commands to move around campus and in the classroom
  • Uses of personal pronouns in first, second and third person singular and plural in Spanish through movement – Yo, el/ella, tu and usted
  • Parts of the body and objects of the environment
  • Uses of adjectives, where adjectives go in a sentence, and the gender rule for adjectives
  • Uses of frequency adverbs while performing actions
  • Numbers from 1 to …
  • Uses of adverbs of place
  • Shapes
  • Pets and farm animals
  • Food and vocabulary related to the action of eating
  • Basic Personal hygiene and vocabulary related to it 
  • Opposites and contrasts
  • Use of the present continuous form

Upper Elementary

Upper Elementary students explore Spanish using TPR & TPR Storytelling, and through specific lessons and mini-projects to acquire new vocabulary and to practice what they learned in previous years. Students are also exposed to some of the beliefs, food, and traditions of the people from the different Spanish speaking countries.

Upper Elementary students will learn the language in an active way instead of word by word memorization. The variety of activities involved allows a successful learning experience.

Students will initially, through physical response review and practice basic commands and vocabulary. After the first weeks of review, short stories, in combination with TPR are presented, introducing new vocabulary relevant to their daily experiences and some cultural aspects of the Hispanic world. 

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Upper Elementary students will learn:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom
  • Basic commands to move around campus and in the classroom
  • Uses of personal pronouns in first, second and third person singular and plural in Spanish through movement – Yo, el/ella, tu and usted
  • The alphabet and special sounds
  • Parts of the body, objects of the environment, animals, colors, shapes, food, other vocabulary following the students curiosity
  • The months of the year
  • Numbers from 1 to …
  • Uses of adjectives, where adjectives go in a sentence, and the gender rule for adjectives
  • Uses of adverbs
  • Opposites and contrasts
  • Use of the present continuous form

Adolescent Community

Adolescent Community Spanish curriculum focuses on strengthening the  interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills, providing the basis to  better prepare students for the high school world language sequence. Students learn various thematic units, use basic vocabulary and phrases and interact in various social situations. In addition, students develop an awareness of the distinct cultures, traditions and celebrations of the Spanish-speaking world. Students complement the lessons with the book Antes de ser libres by Julia Alvarez. 

Adolescent Community students will learn the language in a more traditional way, with a variety of activities to promote a successful learning experience. Along the school year, some of the lessons will be directly related to what the students have been studying in their regular studies (Literature and Physical Expression)

Each set of lessons presents new vocabulary words pertaining to a particular theme. Each topic is first presented in context and then the vocabulary is further practiced through a variety of activities. All the students are encouraged to have an active participation.

It is expected that during the first trimester of the year Adolescent Community students will learn and practice:

  • Expressions of courtesy and basic communication in the classroom
  • Uses of personal pronouns
  • The alphabet and special sounds
  • Master common vocabulary terms and phrases: Numbers, colors, parts of the body, animals, food, and other vocabulary following the students curiosity
  • The months of the year
  • Uses of adjectives, where adjectives go in a sentence, and the gender rule for adjectives
  • Uses of adverbs
  • Opposites and contrasts
  • Use of verbs in present and present continuous form
  • Participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts
  • Analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish speaking countries 
Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Art

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Art

Lower Elementary

Lower Elementary students start off the year by learning how artists behave in their studio, with an emphasis on caring for their materials and art space. They will discover the tools, techniques, and possibilities of the 2-D centers, which include drawing, collage, and painting. Students will consider how artists get their ideas by practicing the Studio Habits of stretching and exploring, envisioning, and observing. They will also begin to practice the Studio Habit of understanding art worlds through picture books and famous artist exemplars. Sketchbooks will be utilized for exercises related to ideation and the Art Elements of line, shape, color, texture and value.

Upper Elementary

Upper Elementary students start off the year by reviewing how artists behave in their studio, with an emphasis on caring for their materials and art space. They will discover the tools, techniques, and possibilities of the 2-D centers, which include drawing, collage, and painting. Students will consider how artists get their ideas by practicing the Studio Habits of stretching and exploring, envisioning, and observing. They will also practice the Studio Habit of understanding art worlds by viewing and discussing the work of established artists. Sketchbooks will be utilized for exercises related to ideation and the Art Elements of line, shape, color, value, texture, form, and space.

Adolescent Community

Our first two elective offerings are:

Unleash Your Creativity!

Student artists will practice the Studio Habits of Stretching & Exploring by participating in a series of exercises designed to enhance creativity. They will have opportunities to work both independently and collaboratively with an emphasis on drawing, collage, and mixed media. Sketch books will be utilized for weekly assignments.   

Zen Arts

Student artists will practice the Studio Habits of Envisioning, Observing, Expressing, and Understanding Art Worlds by viewing and creating meditative art forms such as Zentangle, Sumi-E, and Mandalas. They will have opportunities to work both independently and collaboratively with an emphasis on drawing and painting. Sketchbooks will be utilized for exercises related to mindfulness and personal expression.

 

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Technology

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Technology

Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students is used as a guideline for all technology literacy lessons. 

Lower Elementary

Overview:

Students visit the Media Lab once a week for a scheduled computer lesson on basic computer fundamentals.  Each lesson begins with a short tutorial (https://edu.gcfglobal.org/en/) followed by simple activities to practice these skills. This introduction provides students with basic knowledge such as the functions of hardware, mouse terminology and computer rules. Students will recognize and identify the function of the major hardware components in the computer system. Students use the mouse to perform computer functions, recognize symbols and icons used to identify common functions, and use the keyboard to type letters and numbers, and learn how to use special key functions. Students are expected to use technology in a responsible manner. Digital citizenship and internet safety are part of our instruction at every level. 

  • Log on and off the computer
  • Power on and off the computer
  • Open and close applications
  • Open, Save and close files
  • Print documents
  • Identify parts of a computer
  • Use input device (mouse): Point, select/ click or double click, click/select and hold, drag and drop
  • Move cursor
  • Type / enter letters and numbers
  • Recognize and use icons to perform computer and software functions
  • Use special function keys: delete, shift, arrow keys, space, return / enter, caps lock, backspace, multi-key functions, escape

Keyboarding:

Keyboarding is a foundational skill largely related to motor skills. Students should be able to operate a keyboard effectively in order to take full advantage of computer technology. Students have been introduced to typing club (www.typingclub.com) which is the recommended program that teaches correct finger-to key movement across the entire keyboard. It is a highly effective tool that helps students at all skill levels improve their typing ability through guided lessons and engaging assessments. To fully support the development of typing skills, the expectations for utilizing this site at home is to practice three times per week for no longer than 15 minutes per session. Students will be bringing home a password card with your login information.

Upper Elementary

Overview:

Upper Elementary students visit the Media Lab once a week for a scheduled computer lesson on intermediate computer fundamentals.  Each lesson begins with a short tutorial (https://edu.gcfglobal.org/en/) followed by engaging activities to practice these skills. Students will develop foundations in the understanding and uses of technology systems. These skills provide students the ability to demonstrate knowledge of technology concepts and systems. 

  • Recognize and identify the function of the major hardware components in a computer system. 
  • Identify and use functions represented by symbols and icons commonly found in applications.
  • Identify characteristics that describe input devices and output devices and name some devices that can provide input and output.
  • Understand that there are correct sitting, hand, arm and fingering positions when keyboarding. 
  • Identify types of files by their icons and extensions.
  • Use keyboard and mouse effectively and efficiently.
  • Identify strategies for managing everyday hardware and software problems. 

Students have access to the Media Lab during the morning work cycle to do classroom-related research and digital projects. Upper Elementary students will use computers to research subjects they are interested in, after they have exhausted all resources in the classroom and the school library. 

Email: 

Students have an email account and are for school purposes only. Students have been introduced to Gmail and Google Drive. Students will learn how to manage, send, and respond to messages and how to use it safely. Google Drive is a service from Google that gives students access to web-based applications for creating documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and allows students to store files online and access them anywhere using the cloud. 

Internet Safety:

Students are expected to use technology in a responsible manner. Digital citizenship and internet safety are part of our instruction at every level. Students will learn strategies for staying safe and secure online, learn how to avoid the most common treats and protect their computer and privacy. 

Keyboarding:

Keyboarding is a foundational skill largely related to motor skills. Students should be able to operate a keyboard effectively in order to take full advantage of computer technology. Students have been introduced to typing club (www.typingclub.com) which is the recommended program that teaches correct finger-to key movement across the entire keyboard. It is a highly effective tool that helps students at all skill levels improve their typing ability through guided lessons and engaging assessments. To fully support the development of typing skills, the expectations for utilizing this site at home is to practice three times per week for no longer than 15 minutes per session. Students will be bringing home a password card with your login information.

 

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Physical Education

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Physical Education

Children’s House

  • Spatial Awareness: Students will learn about personal space and moving safely, among others.  
  • Motor Skills: Students will become familiar with or learn different basic motor skills (walking, running, skipping, galloping, etc.).
  • Levels and Speed: Students learn how to move at different levels from the ground and how to move at different speeds,

Lower Elementary

  • Sportsmanship: Students will engage in physical activities and discussions in order to learn about what it means to be a “good/poor sport” and how to be someone “fun” to play with. Topics covered include: being a good teammate, being a good opponent, how to lose gracefully and win humbly, cheating and fair play, anger, and maintaining the integrity of the sport.
  • Cognitive Games: Students will use strategy and logic in activities that will also help to improve basic physical skills like jumping/hopping, throwing/catching, kicking, etc.

Upper Elementary

  • Sportsmanship: Students will engage in physical activities and discussions in order to learn about what it means to be a “good/poor sport” and begin to understand how sportsmanship extends beyond P.E. and playing sports. Topics covered include: being a good teammate, being a good opponent, how to lose gracefully and win humbly, cheating and fair play, anger, and maintaining the integrity of the sport.
  • Cognitive Games: Students will use strategy and logic in activities that will refine basic physical skills like jumping/hopping, throwing/catching, kicking, etc.

Adolescent Community

  • Sportsmanship: Students will engage in physical activities and discussions in order to define and exemplify good and poor sportsmanship.  They will learn how sportsmanship extends beyond P.E. and playing sports. They will learn about self-control and respect as it pertains to real life adult experiences. Topics covered include: being a good teammate, being a good opponent, how to lose gracefully and win humbly, cheating and fair play, anger, and maintaining the integrity of the sport. 
  • Sports Psychology: Students will learn about what happens to their minds in the context of sport and exercise. Some topics we will cover are: motivation, mental training to enhance performance, strategies to improve concentration and minimize distractions, techniques to build up confidence, and how our bodies respond to stress and ways to manage it. 

 

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Music

Fall Enrichment Curriculum – Music

Elementary

The year-long Music To-Go project is designed to introduce students to a variety of musical traditions and techniques which (with practice) can be used to spontaneously produce music for themselves and others.  These traditions and techniques will include circle singing, beatboxing, solkattu, Kodaly singing, and the art of declamation. To this end, the class will be divided between 1. introduction to important figures/events/music in each area of study; 2. instruction/open practice in basic technical skills; 3. call and response; and 4. ensemble work.  The musical components of instruction will prioritize scaffolding practical skills, and weave in and out of traditions according to the focus and needs of each class.  

The culminating project for each unit will fit each class’ interests and strengths.  However, projects will fall somewhere within these lines:
Circle Singing: performance of group composition
Declamation: small group recitation of the Ursonate, or Spotify Ads
Kodaly: folk song in unison or a round using hand signs
Solkattu: 1 or 2 part composition
Beatboxing: beatbox choir plus soloist

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this project students will be able to:

  1. Name an artist they admire from each tradition studied;
  2. Repeat short pitch/rhythmic sequences within each tradition studied;
  3. Produce a solo melodic/rhythmic loop or pattern within each tradition studied.

Adolescent Community

This Creative Expression cycle will focus on learning and working with the iOS app Loopy.  Loopy allows users to record multiple musical ‘loops’. A ‘loop’ is a repeating musical pattern of any length.  A demo of Loopy in action can be found here.

Adolescents will work in pairs on iPads provided by Greenspring.  Our first couple classes will be devoted to learning how to use the app, and develop strategies for generating and executing increasingly complex loops.  Following this instructive period, adolescents will begin to work toward a final project in which they will collaborate with Kim Zerfas (Greenspring’s Director of Marketing and Communications) to design and record loops to accompany Greenspring informational or promotional videos to be shared across Greenspring’s social media profiles.